Blog Posts About Social Media

A How-Not-To Guide to Promoting Facebook Pages

By Ava Naves, Principal

Spam. It can take many forms.Facebook Spam

We’re all familiar with its more traditional incarnation – by e-mail. Then, there’s Twitter spam. You know the kind… you have barely started to follow someone, and BAM! There comes a “friendly” Direct Message, inviting you to visit their affiliate site. There’s also Twitter spam that arrives through “@ replies”: those that come from illegitimate Twitter accounts and contain a link to a titillating site where “ladies” (if you can call them that) await for you.

Worse, even, is when someone starts using his personal Twitter profile to retweet content from a client’s account.

Last but not least… there’s Facebook spam. This type of spam really, really annoys me. From what I recall, I’ve received messages from people in my Vancouver network inviting me to “like” the Page of a local company that I had never heard of; a charitable initiative in Alberta (whereas we’re based in British Columbia), and the Facebook Page for a tourism campaign, just to name a few. You can just tell that people are pimping their own projects. Have they no shame?

What’s even more deplorable is that these (hopefully well-intentioned) folks brand themselves as social media professionals! Little do they realize that they’re throwing their professionalism out the window!

Can they genuinely approach their client (or employer) with a clear conscience, and tell him that all those “likes” came from people who are genuinely interested in their brand?

There are many reasons why Facebook spam is just bad form. Here’s a few:

- Chances are that those friends, who were so nice to accept the Facebook Page suggestion, are not the target audience that will translate into conversions for the client. Yes, they have given their “thumbs up”, but by no means does that imply that they will pay attention to the updates posted on that Facebook Page.

- Those “likes” will probably disappear as quickly as they came. It’s always better to have a slow – yet steadily growing – number of supporters, than to have a windfall at first, followed by a high percentage of “unlikes” shortly after. I bet THAT won’t look too good on that monthly report to your client, will it?

- Facebook Insights (the metrics that Facebook provides about a Page’s performance) analyse the ratio of feedback that an update received (through comments, “likes”, etc) versus how many impressions the update generated. People who organically “like” a Facebook Page are more inclined to interact with that content, causing a higher feedback percentage per message. Now that’s something worth bragging about to a client in that monthly report.

- Last but not least… if you want to erode their professional respect for you, invite them to “like” a Facebook Page that you almost certainly know that they have absolutely no interest in.

There are other reasons why this practice should not be part of your online marketing arsenal, but I’ll stop here. Stop viewing your Facebook friends as commodity, and preserve that network that has taken you so long to grow.

The Crossroads Between Social Media and SEO: Upcoming Presentation at IIMA

By Ava Naves, PrincipalCrossroads Social Media SEO

A couple of weeks ago I was invited by the folks at the International Internet Marketing Association (IIMA) to speak on the same topic that I presented at IMC Vancouver 2010: “The Crossroads between Social Media & SEO”. The event will be at 6:00 pm on this coming Wednesday, October 13th, at the 4th floor of the YWCA Vancouver (535 Hornby Street).

To say that I’m excited is really an  understatement. Having been to several talks at IIMA by respected professionals such as Darren Barefoot, Jason Billingsley, Warren Sukernek and Richard Goossen, I feel honoured that I’ve been chosen to join the roster of speakers at IIMA.

For those not familiar with IIMA, they’re an organization now in its twelfth year. Their goal is “to bring marketers, agencies and professionals together to discuss the capabilities and potential of Internet marketing”, and judging by past events I’ve attended, they have certainly been fulfilling this mandate.

Below is a sample of  what you can expect to learn from the presentation:

- How a well-planned social media presence can increase your search engine visibility.
– The steps you’re probably already applying to search engine optimization, and which can be transplanted to your social media outreach for a stronger presence  on Google and Bing.
– How strategic Twitter updates, blog posts, Facebook statuses and YouTube videos can help your search engine rankings.
– Facebook changes that affect search.

I owe a big thanks to Jose Uzcategui, John Hossack, Charity Robertson and all the folks at IIMA for promoting and making this event possible. I’m sure there are other names that I’m failing to mention.

If you’d like to join us, book your ticket online here.  The cost for this IIMA is quite reasonable (CAD$38.25 for IIMA member, and CAD$45 for non-members)

I’m sure that many of us will get together at a pub nearby to continue to network and “talk shop” after the event, so feel free to join us there as well, and allocate some extra time for a pint!

Influence is More Than Klout-Deep

By Ava Naves, Principal

 

I’ve been in a blogging slumber for months, but some recent experiences with Klout and Twitalyzer, combined with Veronica Heringer’s own good post about Klout, caused me to put my fingers to the keyboard.

Veronica expanded on her thoughts regarding, well, how much clout one should give to Klout’s numbers as a measure of our individual influence on Twitter.

Here’s my take on it: services like Klout and Twitalyzer can be a good accessory in helping marketers to identify potential influencers in a specific realm, but at the end of the day, there’s no substitute for common sense and actually reading an account’s Twitter stream to detect if that person’s (or company’s) updates are valuable.

Why do I say this? Because, yesterday I noticed that a specific Twitter user who, in my books is a spammer (with the best of intentions), ranked very well on Klout. Other than this individual’s malpractices on Twitter, I don’t have anything against this person. What makes it even more difficult to swallow it is that we have met before. I enjoyed our interactions, and would have sincerely thought that this person would think twice before sending me a Direct Message that was clearly promotional, about a topic that I have no interest in.

That Twitter stream – once personal and engaging – is now littered with links upon links that regurgitate headlines, in a fashion that is only employed by less-than-reputable accounts.

As I was saying… as a marketer, I might think that this account is a key influencer in my geographical area were I to solely rely on Twitalyzer and Klout. But, as my parents used to tell me as a kid: “Tell me who you walk with, and I’ll tell you who you are”. Regardless of their score, I’d sure as hell not want to associate myself, nor my clients, with that Twitter user.

Thoughts?